search
New York, New York, USA

Chelsea Green Multi-Residential in New York

Balcony at Chelsea Green Residence in NYC

Balcony at Chelsea Green Residence in NYC

Chelsea Green Residence in NYC

Chelsea Green Residence in NYC

Isokorb® installation at Chelsea Green

Isokorb® installation at Chelsea Green 

Isokorb® installation at Chelsea Green

Isokorb® installation at Chelsea Green 

Schöck's structural thermal break product contributes to the holistic, "healthy lifestyle" vision of New York City's Alfa Development.

Just a few blocks from the High Line, the now-famous restored elevated railway bed that today sports pedestrian walkways amid a landscape of greenery chosen for its hardiness and sustainability, a 14-story building is rising in New York's historic Chelsea neighborhood that promises its future residents a better way to live.

The 74,000 square foot concrete structure includes Schöck's Isokorb® Type CM thermal break connections in the balconies on the 11th through the 14th floors to further enhance the building's energy performance. Each balcony at Chelsea Green is cantilevered out 7 feet on 8-inch-thick tapered concrete slabs. "Traditional balcony attachments deal primarily with only the structural cantilever and as a result transmit exterior temperatures to the interior floor slabs, adding to the energy use of the unit." said Frank Mattiello, Senior Project Manager at Alpha Development. "This thermal bridge effect can be felt when walking barefoot in one's apartment, even when the heating or cooling systems are in operation." Isokorb®'s type CM provide load bearing thermal insulation for these slabs and transfer bending moment stress and shear forces. Their integrated hanging and tensile reinforcement mitigates the use of other costly elements like stirrups or hooped mat. "Their modular configuration enables simple installation and submittal design," Mattiello added.

Architect

Stephen B. Jacobs Group

Structural Engineer

WSP Cantor

Construction Company

DJM Construction

Start of construction

Winter 2011

End of construction

Planned for Summer 2013